Police reports relating to Thomas Hamilton a nd the shooting of 16 children and their teacher at Dunblane Primary School on March 13, 1996, are to be made public.

Lord Advocate Colin Boyd QC announced that every report submitted to the Procurator Fiscal would be made available in a form which removes personal references so that no child or witness could be identified.

The redacted copies of the reports will be available from the National Archives of Scotland from today but there are no online versions.  [Ed. ~ WHY?  Let the nation, indeed, the world, see how ridiculously impaired they are.  See my own "unimpaired" embargoed files put on Cullen's 100-year "gagging order".]

Other key points include:

  • Detective Superintendent Paul Hughes' internal memo about Thomas Hamilton's firearms certificate was read out in full to the Dunblane Inquiry and can be found in full in the transcript of the Inquiry.
  • None of the reports contains allegations against politicians or other prominent figures.
  • Disclosure of reports of this nature is not to be interpreted as undermining the presumption, supported by the Scottish courts, that police reports are confiden-tial.

In response to a Parliamentary Question, the Lord Advocate said:

"In light of recent public concern expressed about the 100-year closure period all police reports submitted to the Procurator Fiscal in relation to Thomas Hamilton have been reviewed.  I have considered whether or not it would be appropriate at this stage to make such reports available for public inspection.

"Given the sensitive nature of much of the material which might cause anguish to those involved, my prime concern in considering this request has been to ensure that the privacy of those children referred to in the report should be maintained.  [Ed ~ Even when they were finally released on 3 October 2005, the names of witnesses, street names and even the name of a pub were removed from the illegally closed files.  What was the purpose of this?   Was it to make it more difficult for prying minds to awake to the magnitude of the whitewash?]

"In the exceptional circumstances of this case I have decided that the public interest would be best served by making arrangements to have the reports dated August 30, 1988, September 1991, July 3, 1992, and June 9, 1993, and associated witness statements, made available in a form which removes personal data and ensures that there is no prospect of any of the children or witnesses being identified.

"Accordingly photocopies with such information redacted will be placed in the released record, while the originals remain closed to be reviewed and released at a later date. Arrangements will be made to lodge these at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh, where members of the public can gain access to them in the normal manner".   [Ed ~ The Lord Advocate Colin Boyd refused me access to the letters I sent to Lord Cullen,the selfsame letters Cullen put on his nonstatutory, illegal 100-year gagging order.  However, I was just testing him.  I had retained copies of the correspondence in any event so they were immediately lobbed onto my web site, regardless.]

Parliamentary question

Tom McCabe (Hamilton South Lab):

To ask the Lord Advocate what decision has been taken in relation to the release of DS Paul Hughes report to the Procurator Fiscal at Stirling in 1991 about Thomas Hamilton.

Lord Advocate:

Following the shooting of 16 schoolchildren and their teacher, and the suicide of Thomas Hamilton, on 13 March 1996 at Dunblane Primary School, the then Secretary of State for Scotland established an Inquiry under the Tribunals of Inquiry (Evidence) Act 1921.

The Inquiry was chaired by Lord Cullen and the remit was to inquire into the circumstances leading up to and surrounding the events at Dunblane Primary School on Wednesday 13 March 1996, and to consider the issues arising therefrom.  The Inquiry sat for 26 days, between 29 May and 10 July 1996 and the whole proceedings were held in public and recorded by shorthand writers.  The report of the inquiry and the transcript of the evidence is available on the Internet.

In the course of the Inquiry a large number of documents were lodged with the Clerk to the Inquiry and copies of all productions were given to those represented at the Inquiry, including those representing the parents of the dead and injured.  All of these productions were available for reference in the course of the Inquiry and any issue arising from those documents could have been raised during the proceedings.

In January 1997 there was a meeting between the Clerk to the Inquiry, and representatives of the Scottish Record Office and the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.  Following that meeting it was agreed that copies of all the productions in the Inquiry should be lodged with the Scottish Record Office (now the National Archives of Scotland).  It was also agreed that there should be a closure period of 100 years, because many of the productions referred to people who were children at the time.  It was further agreed that these productions could be accessed with the consent of the Crown by those showing a legitimate interest. Lord Cullen was consulted and indicated that he was content with what had been agreed.

There is no statutory basis for the closure of records created by Scottish public bodies.  The Public Records (Scotland) Act 1937 (the 1937 Act) makes provision for the preservation, care and custody of the public records of Scotland.  The terms of the legislation are permissive.

By contrast, in England and Wales the Public Records Act 1958 (as amended by the Public Records Act 1967) sets a statutory "closure period" of 30 years after which records must, with limited exceptions, be made available to the public.  The 1937 Act does not impose similar obligations on Executive departments, but in practice those procedures are followed in Scotland.

The criteria for closures longer than 30 years were defined in the 1993 White Paper on Open Government (CMD2290), in accordance with which it is for the department responsible for depositing the material to decide on the closure period.  In Scotland, the National Archives of Scotland cannot vary this closure period and cannot produce "closed records" to the public without the permission of the depositing department.

The White Paper sets out a clear statement of principle as to what information should be made available and what ought properly to be kept confidential in the public interest.

Documents containing information about individuals, whose disclosure would cause either substantial distress, or endangerment from a third party to persons affected by disclosure or their descendants can be subject to a variable closure period of between 40 and 100 years.

When the productions for the Inquiry were lodged with the Scottish Record Office no effort was made to distinguish between productions making references to children and other productions because of the sheer volume of the material.  [Ed ~ The sheer volume of the material was irrelevant because the files were all given distinct reference numbers.  When I quoted the reference number to the Keeper of the Records at the National Archives of Scotland, I received a prompt and satisfactory reply, but when I contacted the Crown Office the Lord Advocate Colin Boyd used the "sheer volume etc," invention to withhold what should have been unedited public information.]

In light of recent public concern expressed about the 100-year closure period all police reports submitted to the Procurator Fiscal in relation to Thomas Hamilton have been reviewed.  I have considered whether or not it would be appropriate at this stage to make such reports available for public inspection.  Given the sensitive nature of much of the material, which might cause anguish to those involved, my prime concern in considering this request has been to ensure that the privacy of those children referred to in the report should be maintained.  I am also conscious of the need to abide by the terms of the Data Protection Act 1998.

In the exceptional circumstances of this case I have decided that the public interest would be best served by making arrangements to have the reports dated 30 August 1988, September 1991, 3 July 1992 and 9 June 1993, and associated witness statements, made available in a form which removes personal data and ensures that there is no prospect of any of the children or witnesses being identified.

Accordingly photocopies with such information redacted will be placed in the released record, while the originals remain closed to be reviewed and released at a later date. Arrangements will be made to lodge these at the National Archives of Scotland, Edinburgh where members of the public can gain access to them in the normal manner.

The internal memo dated 11 November 1991 from DS Hughes to his superior officers requesting that consideration be given to withdrawing Thomas Hamilton's firearms certificate as a precautionary measure was read out by then Superintendent Joseph Holden of Central Scotland Police on day 7 of the inquiry and can be found at pages 862 and 863 of the transcript. Superintendent Holden also read out the comments noted on the memo by superior officers.

None of these reports contains allegations against politicians or other prominent figures.

Disclosure of reports of this nature is not to be interpreted as undermining the presumption, supported by the Scottish courts, that police reports are confidential.  That presumption is necessary to ensure that witnesses or those under investigation are not inhibited or deterred from co-operating in criminal investigations by the possibility that information provided might be disclosed and their identities revealed to the public outwith the protection of the court.

At this time unrestricted access to the productions cannot be allowed because of the sheer volume of the material and the fact that much of it refers to children.  I have decided in the light of recent interest that the material should be catalogued by staff at the National Archives of Scotland in a way which does not lead to the identification of children.  When a full catalogue is available, I will consider further the extended closure of the papers and whether other material which does not identify children or whose release would not be contrary to the data protection legislation can be made available, or whether it would be appropriate to vary, in any particular case, the closure period.

- ENDS -

Colin Boyd Lord Advocate
     Lord Cullen       Former Lord President
Malcolm Rifkind Former Foreign Secretary
Elish Angiolini Solicitor General for Scotland
Lord James Douglas-Hamilton ex-Scottish Minister
Michael McMahon Convener Public Petitions Committee
News Release
Dunblane police reports released

18/03/2003

The Three Amigos :—

Lord Cullen

Thomas Hamilton

Colin Boyd QC

Copyright © 2016 Billy Burns. All rights reserved.

Data Protection Act
Campaign for a new, unconditional Dunblane Inquiry

Dunblane Cover-up
How many more non-Spec Law Lords are Masons nevertheless?
Acknowledgement:
Credit to Tom Minogue for unearthing the Spec roll of dishonour and also its founding members.
Law Lords who are members of the exclusive, secretive, Masonic and highly suspect Speculative Society of Edinburgh (Spec):
google
WWW Dunblane Whitewash
google
WWW Dunblane Whitewash
Dunblane Massacre
Click here to view the full list in the Dunblane Whitewash catalogue
The stained glass window in St Blane's Church, Dunblane, which commemorates the victims of the 1996 massacre
Emma Crozier
Kevin Hassell
Victoria Clydesdale
Ross Irvine
David Kerr
John Petrie
Hanna Scott
Joanna Ross
Sophie North
Emily Morton
Maegan Turner
Brett McKinnon
Abigail McLennan
Charlotte Dunn
Mhairi MacBeath
Melissa Currie
Gwen Hodson/Mayor - schoolteacher
List of the victims of the Dunblane massacre
Ed ~ Why did Lord Cullen try to bury my letters to him for 100 years?  Read them here. LINK
We know that the above victims were killed by Thomas Hamilton, but, although we may not care, we do not know for sure who killed Thomas Hamilton, and why that person was carrying a revolver at the time!
Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC. Data Protection Act. Lord Cullen. Thomas Hamilton. Colin Boyd QC.
http://dunblane.site/reportsreleased.htm